Choosing a baby name 101

It seems in the past few years that baby names have taken a left turn at the common sense intersection. Those of us working with children (teachers, doctors, nurses, childcare workers) would have certainly noticed this shift in name trends. Of course, popular culture has always influenced the choice of moniker for our offspring. Unfortunately (in my humble opinion), our pop culture now includes such institutions such as Glee, Big Brother and the like. Parents are now naming their children to reflect their (often misplaced) love for these TV shows and movies. In the past, this choice of strange names was limited to the rich and famous: Moon Unit, Pilot Inspektor, Fifi Trixibelle and Sage Moonblood, the list goes on. But the general populous is catching on. Just have a look at the names that are apparently growing in popularity:

Girls                  

  1. Isla
  2. Adalyn
  3. Giuliana
  4. Olive
  5. Kinsley (too close to ‘Kinsey’ for me)
  6. Evangeline
  7. Paisley
  8. Vivienne
  9. Maci
  10. Kinley

Boys

  1. Bentley
  2. Kellan
  3. Kingston
  4. Aarav (clearly just to be at the top of alpha lists)
  5. Ryker
  6. Beckett
  7. Colt
  8. Paxton (as in the star of Twister? Come on)
  9. Jax
  10. Lincoln

A UK study found that 1 in 5 parents experienced resultant disappointment and regret in the different name they chose and wished they had done more research. That or not to have been drunk when choosing.  As clinicians and educators we must also consider the inevitable future Axis 2 diagnosis(es) that the poor child is lumped with.

In light of these poor choices and the future psychiatric consequences, below is a handy reference tool that should help your steer clear of pitfalls in the name game. For our players in ED, you can keep this card and tick off each time you see an example during your shift. The doctor/nurse with the highest score ‘wins’. Enjoy!

Happy to see further examples of names….or additions for the flow chart in the comment section!

What's in a name?

What’s in a name?

References

1. Good or Bad, Baby Names Have Long-lasting Effects. Retrieved February 9, 2011, from Live Science.com: http://www.livescience.com/6569-good-bad-baby-names-long-lasting-effects.html

2. Flora, C. (2004, March 01). Hello, My Name is Unique. Retrieved February 9, 2011, from Psychology Today.

3. http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/40461260/ns/today-today_celebrates_2010/t/glee-effect-baby-names-reflect-love-tv-movies/#.UOJPee3n00w

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5 Comments

Filed under #FOAMed, Emergency Medicine, General Practice, Humour

5 responses to “Choosing a baby name 101

  1. I think another good test is to shout out the name out wish to call your child in a crowded park and if you’re greeted with strange looks then you should probably avoid that name.

  2. Pingback: Breathing New Life 2013 (Part 1) | ruralflyingdoc

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